Document Detail
Resource utilization of C4 tropical grasses at elevated CO2
Abstract/OtherAbstract :
The atmospheric (CO2) partial pressure is expected to continue to increase and the scenario is that the CO2 partial pressure will reach 50-70 Pa during the 21st century.The rise in CO2 will have a direct influence on plant growth and development because CO2 is the primary substrate for photosynthesis.The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the response of grasses belonging to two subtypes to a range of CO2 partial pressures under conditions where light intensity, water and N supplies were varied.Two species which are naturalized in Australia, Panicum coloratum (NAD-ME) and Cenchrus ciliaris (NADP-ME) were chosen for a series of experiments conducted in matched growth chambers. The response of C4 plants is particularly important for Australia because they dominate the tropical grasslands that occupy 75% of the continent and form the basis for the pasture industry. Following the extensive research conducted in this study, it can be concluded that the inevitable rise in atmospheric CO2 partial pressure will increase the growth of C4 grasses when other resources are not limiting.Growth of C4 grasses will be stimulated to a greater extent under conditions of drought., Doctor of Philsophy (PhD)
Authors :
Rudmann, Silvia G., University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Horticulture and Plant Science
Contributors :
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Publication Detail :
Publisher :  -     Type :  -     Format :  -    
Date Detail :
2000
Subject :
Australian grasslands, photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide, plant-atmosphere relationships
Coverage :
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Relation :
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Source :
THESIS_FST_HPS_Rudmann_S.xml
Copyright Information :
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Other Details :
Languages :  eng    
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