Document Detail


The widening gap in low birthweight rates between extreme social groups in Poland during 1985-90.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7870622     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
An attempt was made to identify the reasons for the increase in low birthweight (LBW) rates in Poland from 8.1% in 1985 to 8.4% in 1990. It was found that there was a differential increase in the LBW rates among the social groups. The highest increase was observed among the least educated mothers, especially in large cities. The LBW rate among the newborns of mothers who had finished their education at primary school level increased from 10.6% (in large cities from 14.7%) in 1985 to 12.5% (in large cities to 16.2%) in 1990. Controlling for maternal age, parity, education and place of residence did not change the significance of the increase in the LBW rate. The decline in birthweight was probably largely related to negative changes in socially differentiated levels of consumption of basic nutrients in Poland.
Authors:
Z J Brzezinski; K Szamotulska
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Paediatric and perinatal epidemiology     Volume:  8     ISSN:  0269-5022     ISO Abbreviation:  Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol     Publication Date:  1994 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1995-03-28     Completed Date:  1995-03-28     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8709766     Medline TA:  Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  373-83     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
National Research Institute for Mother and Child, Department of Epidemiology and Programming, Warsaw, Poland.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight*
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Poland / epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Risk Factors
Socioeconomic Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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