Document Detail


Value of prenatal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of congenital primary cytomegalovirus infection.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20503234     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of pregnancies with proven and well-dated primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection with and without abnormal fetal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.
METHODS: This was a prospective study of 38 singleton pregnancies with proven vertical transmission of CMV and prenatal ultrasound and MRI examinations. Entry requirements included precise dating of the pregnancy and known time of maternal infection. Neonatal follow-up was a strict requirement, all neonates having eye fundus examination, a brain ultrasound scan and a hearing evaluation. All children were followed up by specialists in child development.
RESULTS: Primary CMV infection occurred during the first trimester in 10 patients, the second trimester in 19 and the third trimester in nine. Twenty-four of 29 patients with first- or second-trimester infections delivered; the other five underwent termination of pregnancy (TOP). Three patients had abnormal sonographic findings with normal MRI. Of these, two had damage to the auditory system. In both cases, infection occurred during the first trimester. In 16 patients with first- or second-trimester infection, both ultrasound and MRI exams were normal; there was one TOP but all other cases had favorable outcome, with normal hearing and developmental evaluations. The outcome of five pregnancies with subtle MRI findings and normal ultrasound exam was also favorable. None of the children infected during the third trimester was affected.
CONCLUSION: The outcome of congenital primary CMV infection with normal prenatal ultrasound and MRI exams is favorable. The prognostic value of subtle MRI findings is limited and when such findings are isolated, termination of pregnancy is unlikely to be justified.
Authors:
S Lipitz; C Hoffmann; B Feldman; M Tepperberg-Dikawa; E Schiff; B Weisz
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2010-04-15
Journal Detail:
Title:  Ultrasound in obstetrics & gynecology : the official journal of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology     Volume:  36     ISSN:  1469-0705     ISO Abbreviation:  Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol     Publication Date:  2010 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-11-25     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9108340     Medline TA:  Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  709-17     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2010 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel. boazmd@zahav.net.il
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