Document Detail


The use of inotropic drugs in myocardial contusion: 2 case reports.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7356702     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Myocardial contusion is a common complication of blunt chest injury. Severe heart failure and shock may result. The haemodynamic consequences of myocardial contusion in two patients are described; both received inotropic agents. In the first patient dobutamine was successful in improving myocardial function; dopamine had similar effects on the heart. In the second patient dopamine, preferred for its renal effects, produced a short-term improvement in myocardial function. The rational use of pharmacological agents in this condition demands precise understanding of the underlying haemodynamic disturbances.
Authors:
R C Macdonald; C D Hanning; I M Ledingham
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Intensive care medicine     Volume:  6     ISSN:  0342-4642     ISO Abbreviation:  Intensive Care Med     Publication Date:  1980  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1980-03-24     Completed Date:  1980-03-24     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7704851     Medline TA:  Intensive Care Med     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  19-23     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Cardiotonic Agents / therapeutic use*
Catecholamines / therapeutic use*
Contusions / drug therapy*
Dobutamine / therapeutic use*
Dopamine / therapeutic use*
Heart Injuries / drug therapy*
Humans
Male
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Cardiotonic Agents; 0/Catecholamines; 34368-04-2/Dobutamine

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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