Document Detail


The use of in utero MRI to supplement ultrasound in the foetus at high risk of developmental brain or spine abnormality.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22763035     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: It is widely accepted that the diagnosis of foetal central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities can be improved by performing MRI examinations in utero. Most of the published literature has concentrated on pregnancies in which a developmental abnormality has been detected (or suspected) on ultrasound in an otherwise low-risk pregnancy. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that in utero MRI of the foetal brain in high-risk pregnancies will detect abnormalities not shown by ultrasound at a rate that justifies its use in clinical practice.
METHODS: 100 females were recruited into the study from foeto-maternal or clinical genetic departments. They all had a foetus/child with a CNS malformation from an earlier pregnancy, which led to an increased risk of recurrence being quoted for the present pregnancy. All in utero MRI examinations were performed on 1.5 T clinical MRI systems at 18 weeks gestational age or later.
RESULTS: In 78% of cases, the ultrasound and MRI results agreed and showed no abnormality. In 13%, ultrasound and MRI described identical abnormal findings. In 9%, the ultrasound and MRI examinations had discrepant findings; in all these cases the MRI findings described more serious CNS pathology. The effects on management were judged to be major, by at least one assessor, in 7/9 of those cases.
CONCLUSION: As in many other situations involving antenatal detection of CNS abnormalities, in utero MRI should be considered in females with increased risk of foetal CNS malformation based on the results of an earlier pregnancy. Advances in knowledge In utero MRI of the foetus has an important role in antenatal diagnosis of females carrying a foetus with an increased risk of a brain abnormality.
Authors:
P D Griffiths; M Porteous; G Mason; S Russell; J Morris; E M Fanou; M J Reeves
Related Documents :
12802645 - Early postnatal behavior deficits after maternal carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum during...
15932885 - Short periods of prenatal stress affect growth, behaviour and hypothalamo-pituitary-adr...
16216005 - Hippocampal morphology is differentially affected by reproductive experience in the mot...
12119865 - The female athlete. before and beyond puberty.
10607945 - Ultrasound screening for fetal chromosome anomalies.
20395665 - Preeclampsia and adiponectin in cord blood.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-07-04
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of radiology     Volume:  85     ISSN:  1748-880X     ISO Abbreviation:  Br J Radiol     Publication Date:  2012 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-23     Completed Date:  2013-01-04     Revised Date:  2013-11-06    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0373125     Medline TA:  Br J Radiol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e1038-45     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Academic Unit of Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. p.griffiths@sheffield.ac.uk
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Brain / abnormalities,  embryology*,  pathology
Female
Fetal Diseases / diagnosis*,  ultrasonography
Fetus / abnormalities,  pathology
Gestational Age
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging* / methods
Pregnancy
Risk Factors
Spine / abnormalities,  embryology*,  ultrasonography
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  MRI evaluation of neoadjuvant low-dose fractionated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in pat...
Next Document:  Male infertility: the role of imaging in diagnosis and management.