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On systolic murmurs and cardiovascular physiological maneuvers.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23209004     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Physiological principles that directly apply to physical diagnosis provide opportune occasions to bring basic science to the bedside. In this article, we describe the effect of cardiac maneuvers on systolic murmurs and how physiological principles apply to the explanation of the changes noted at the bedside. We discuss the effect of Valsalva, squatting, and hand grip maneuvers on different physiological parameters influencing preload, afterload, chamber dimensions, and pressure gradients. The clinical manifestations noted during the aforementioned maneuvers are described in common cardiac conditions responsible for the production of certain systolic murmurs.
Authors:
Sergio A Salazar; Jose L Borrero; David M Harris
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Advances in physiology education     Volume:  36     ISSN:  1522-1229     ISO Abbreviation:  Adv Physiol Educ     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-04     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100913944     Medline TA:  Adv Physiol Educ     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  251-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida.
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