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A systematic review of randomized controlled trials for prevention or treatment of atopic dermatitis in dogs: 2008-2011 update.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23331686     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Background -  The management of atopic dermatitis (AD) in dogs relies mainly on the use of interventions to reduce pruritus and skin lesions. Objectives -  To provide a critical analysis of recent clinical trials reporting the efficacy and safety of interventions for canine AD. Methods -  Systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published, presented or completed between 2008 and 2011, which enrolled dogs with AD. The search was done using electronic databases, reviewing published meeting abstracts and sending queries to professional email lists. Trials reporting the efficacy of interventions aimed at treating, preventing or reducing glucocorticoid usage in atopic dogs were selected. Results -  Twenty-one RCTs were included. We found further moderate-quality evidence of efficacy and safety of oral glucocorticoids and ciclosporin for treatment of canine AD. There was additional moderate-quality evidence of the efficacy of a topical glucocorticoid spray containing hydrocortisone aceponate. Low-quality evidence was found for the efficacy and safety of injectable recombinant interferons, a budesonide leave-on conditioner, a ciclosporin topical nano-emulsion and oral fexofenadine. There is low-quality evidence of efficacy of oral masitinib, with a need for monitoring for protein-losing nephropathy. Finally, we uncovered low-quality evidence of efficacy of a commercial diet as a glucocorticoid-sparing intervention and of a glucocorticoid spray as a flare-delaying measure. Very low-quality evidence was found for the efficacy of other interventions. Conclusions and clinical importance -  Topical or oral glucocorticoids and oral ciclosporin remain the interventions with highest evidence for efficacy and relative safety for treatment of canine AD.
Authors:
Thierry Olivry; Petra Bizikova
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Veterinary dermatology     Volume:  24     ISSN:  1365-3164     ISO Abbreviation:  Vet. Dermatol.     Publication Date:  2013 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9426187     Medline TA:  Vet Dermatol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  97-e26     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Sciences and Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA.
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