Document Detail


Race/ethnicity, sleep duration, and diabetes mellitus: analysis of the National Health Interview Survey.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22269619     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The effect of race/ethnicity on the risk of diabetes associated with sleep duration has not been systematically investigated. This study assessed whether blacks reporting short (<6 hours) or long (>8 hours) sleep durations were at greater risk for diabetes than their white counterparts. In addition, this study also examined whether the influence of race/ethnicity on associations between abnormal sleep durations and the presence of diabetes were independent of individuals' sociodemographic and medical characteristics.
METHODS: A total of 29,818 Americans (age range: 18-85 years) enrolled in the 2005 National Health Interview Survey, a cross-sectional household interview survey, provided complete data for this analysis.
RESULTS: Of the sample, 85% self-ascribed their ethnicity as white and 15% as black. The average age was 47.4 years, and 56% were female. Results of univariate regression analysis adjusting for medical comorbidities showed that black and white participants who reported short sleep duration (<6 hours) were more likely to have diabetes than individuals who reported sleeping 6 to 8 hours (odds ratios 1.66 and 1.87, respectively). Likewise, black and white participants reporting long sleep duration (>8 hours) had a greater likelihood of reporting diabetes compared with those sleeping 6 to 8 hours (odds ratios 1.68 and 2.33, respectively). Significant interactions of short and long sleep with black and white race were observed. Compared with white participants, greater diabetes risk was associated with being short or long sleepers of black race.
CONCLUSION: The present findings suggest that American short and long sleepers of black race may be at greater risk for diabetes independently of their sociodemographic profile or the presence of comorbid medical conditions, which have been shown to influence habitual sleep durations. Among black individuals at risk for diabetes, healthcare providers should stress the need for adequate sleep.
Authors:
Ferdinand Zizi; Abhishek Pandey; Renee Murrray-Bachmann; Miriam Vincent; Samy McFarlane; Gbenga Ogedegbe; Girardin Jean-Louis
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of medicine     Volume:  125     ISSN:  1555-7162     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Med.     Publication Date:  2012 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-01-24     Completed Date:  2012-03-13     Revised Date:  2014-09-22    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0267200     Medline TA:  Am J Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  162-7     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus / epidemiology,  ethnology*
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Factors
Sleep Disorders / epidemiology,  ethnology*
Time Factors
United States / epidemiology
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 MD004113/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS; R01 MD004113-04/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS; R01MD004113/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS; R25 HL105444/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R25 HL105444-03/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R25HL105444/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
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From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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