Document Detail


The role of cultural values and religion on views of body size and eating practices among adolescents from Fiji, Tonga, and Australia.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23013263     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: This study investigated cultural values related to body image and eating practices in Western and non-Western societies. DESIGN AND METHODS: In total, 628 Fijian, 463 Indo-Fijian, 598 Tongan, and 534 Australian adolescents completed measures of cultural values and religious influences in relation to the ideal body and eating practices. RESULTS: Fijian and Tongan adolescents were more likely to value a large body. Religious influences were most strongly associated with eating practices for Fijians, Indo-Fijians, and Tongans. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the role of religion in transmitting cultural values regarding eating practices in Pacific Island communities. STATEMENT OF CONTRIBUTION: What is already known on this subject? Previous research has demonstrated that sociocultural factors shape body image and eating behaviours. Most of this research has been conducted in Western countries. What does this study add? The current study identifies the role of cultural values and religious influences on body image and eating behaviours in a number of different cultural groups. This is the first study to use the same methodology to explore these relationships across Western and Pacific Island communities.
Authors:
Marita P McCabe; Gade Waqa; Anjileena Dev; Tilema Cama; Boyd A Swinburn
Related Documents :
20817913 - Relational mobility explains between- and within-culture differences in self-disclosure...
22365693 - Utilization of endogenous fatty acid stores for energy production in bovine preimplanta...
22658153 - Addition of hyaluronic acid improves cellular infiltration and promotes early-stage cho...
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-9-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  British journal of health psychology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  2044-8287     ISO Abbreviation:  Br J Health Psychol     Publication Date:  2012 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-9-27     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9605409     Medline TA:  Br J Health Psychol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
© 2012 The British Psychological Society.
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  The influence of predation and competition on the survival of commensal and pathogenic fecal bacteri...
Next Document:  Defensive dehumanization in the medical practice: A cross-sectional study from a health care worker'...