Document Detail


The relationship of bone and blood lead to hypertension. The Normative Aging Study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8609684     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that long-term lead accumulation, as reflected by levels of lead in bone (as opposed to blood which reflects recent lead exposure), is associated with an increased odds of developing hypertension.
DESIGN: Case-control study of participants in the Veterans Administration (now Department of Veterans Affairs) Normative Aging Study, a 30-year longitudinal study of men.
PARTICIPANTS: Of 1171 active subjects who were seen between August 1991 and December 1994, 590 (50%) participated in this investigation and had data on all variables of interest.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hypertension was defined as taking daily medication for the treatment of hypertension or systolic blood pressure higher than 160 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure of 96 mm Hg or higher during the time of examination. Levels of lead in the tibia (representing cortical bone) and the patella (representing trabecular bone) were measured in vivo with a K x-ray fluorescence (KXRF) instrument. Levels of lead in blood were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.
RESULTS: Blood lead levels were low, ranging from less than 0.05 to 1.35 micromol/L (<1 to 28 microgram/dL), with a mean (SD) of 0.30 (0.20) micromol/L (6.3[4.1] microgram/dL). Bone lead levels were similar to those described in other general populations. In comparison to nonhypertensives, mean levels of lead in blood and both tibia and patella bone lead levels were significantly higher in hypertensive subjects. In a logistic regression model of hypertensive status that began with age, race, body mass index, family history of hypertension, history of ethanol ingestion, pack-years of smoking, dietary sodium intake, dietary calcium intake, blood lead, tibia lead, and patella lead, the variables that remained after backward elimination were body mass index, family history of hypertension, and level of lead in the tibia. An increase from the midpoint of the lowest quintile to the midpoint of the highest quintile of tibia lead from 3 to 37 micrograms per gram of bone mineral was associated with an increased odds ratio of hypertension of 1.5.
CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that long-term lead accumulation, as reflected by levels of lead in bone, may be an independent risk factor for developing hypertension in men in the general population.
Authors:
H Hu; A Aro; M Payton; S Korrick; D Sparrow; S T Weiss; A Rotnitzky
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  JAMA     Volume:  275     ISSN:  0098-7484     ISO Abbreviation:  JAMA     Publication Date:  1996 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1996-05-28     Completed Date:  1996-05-28     Revised Date:  2014-09-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7501160     Medline TA:  JAMA     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1171-6     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age Factors
Aged
Biological Markers / analysis
Blood Pressure
Body Burden
Bone and Bones / chemistry*
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Hypertension / blood,  etiology*
Lead / analysis*,  blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patella / chemistry
Risk Factors
Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Tibia / chemistry
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
NIEHS 2 P30 ES 00002/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; NIEHS ES 05257-01A1/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; NIEHS P42-ES05947/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Biological Markers; 2P299V784P/Lead
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
JAMA. 1996 Oct 2;276(13):1037; author reply 1038   [PMID:  8847762 ]
JAMA. 1996 Oct 2;276(13):1037-8   [PMID:  8847763 ]
Erratum In:
JAMA 1996 Oct 2;276(13):1038

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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