Document Detail


A reconsideration of the relation between age and mean utterance length.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  3762103     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Although a linear relationship between age and utterance length during the preschool years has been reported, that result was only partially replicated from age 2 to 5 years in two new research samples, one cross-sectional and the other longitudinal in design. Instead, a deceleration in age curves, particularly beyond about 36 months, was observed in each sample. Some explanations and implications of the findings are discussed from normative and developmental viewpoints.
Authors:
H Scarborough; J Wyckoff; R Davidson
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of speech and hearing research     Volume:  29     ISSN:  0022-4685     ISO Abbreviation:  J Speech Hear Res     Publication Date:  1986 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1986-11-18     Completed Date:  1986-11-18     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376336     Medline TA:  J Speech Hear Res     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  394-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age Factors
Child Language*
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Language Development*
Male
Speech
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HD12278/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HD18409/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HD18571/HD/NICHD NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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