Document Detail


A rare case of effusive constrictive cholesterol pericarditis: a case report and review.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23606853     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Effusive constrictive cholesterol pericarditis is exceedingly rare. Most cases have an unclear etiology but can be associated with rheumatoid arthritis, tuberculosis infection, and hypothyroidism. The hallmark of the effusion is the distinctively high levels of cholesterol. We present the case of a 68-year-old male with prolonged symptoms of dyspnea with associated moderate pericardial effusion that were later determined to be constrictive effusive etiology, and the patient was referred for stripping with pathologic cholesterol crystal formation on pathology review.
Authors:
Van W Adamson; Jennifer N Slim; Kenneth M Leclerc; Ahmad M Slim
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2013-04-01
Journal Detail:
Title:  Case reports in medicine     Volume:  2013     ISSN:  1687-9627     ISO Abbreviation:  Case Rep Med     Publication Date:  2013  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-04-22     Completed Date:  2013-04-23     Revised Date:  2013-04-24    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101512910     Medline TA:  Case Rep Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  439505     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Cardiology Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX 78234, USA.
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