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r-Process nucleosynthesis without excess neutrons.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12484993     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Matter expanding sufficiently rapidly and at high enough entropy per nucleon can enter a heavy-element synthesis regime heretofore unexplored. In this extreme regime, more similar to nucleosynthesis in the early universe than to that typical in stellar explosive environments, there is a persistent disequilibrium between free nucleons and abundant alpha particles, which allows heavy r-process nucleus production even in matter with more protons than neutrons. This observation bears on the issue of the site of the r process, on the variability of abundance yields from r-process events, and on constraints on neutrino physics derived from nucleosynthesis.
Authors:
Bradley S Meyer
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2002-11-18
Journal Detail:
Title:  Physical review letters     Volume:  89     ISSN:  0031-9007     ISO Abbreviation:  Phys. Rev. Lett.     Publication Date:  2002 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-12-17     Completed Date:  2003-01-28     Revised Date:  2003-11-04    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0401141     Medline TA:  Phys Rev Lett     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  231101     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0978, USA. mbradle@clemson.edu
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