Document Detail


A prospective study of social networks in relation to total mortality and cardiovascular disease in men in the USA.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8935453     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have established a relationship between low levels of social networks and total mortality, but few have examined cause specific mortality or disease incidence. This study aimed to examine prospectively the relationships between social networks and total and cause specific mortality, as well as cardiovascular disease incidence. DESIGN: This was a four year follow up study in an ongoing cohort of men, for whom information on social networks was collected at baseline. The main outcome measures were total mortality, further categorised into deaths from cardiovascular disease (stroke and coronary heart disease), total cancer, accidents/suicides, and all other causes; as well as stroke and coronary heart disease incidence. PARTICIPANTS: Altogether 32,624 US male health professionals aged 42 to 77 years in 1988, who were free of coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer at baseline. RESULTS: A total of 511 deaths occurred during 122,911 person years of follow up. Compared with men with the highest level of social networks, socially isolated men (not married, fewer than six friends or relatives, no membership in church or community groups) were at increased risk for cardiovascular disease mortality (age adjusted relative risk, 1.90; 95% CI 1.07, 3.37) and deaths from accidents and suicides (age adjusted relative risk 2.22; 95% CI 0.76, 6.47). No excess risks were found for other causes of death. Socially isolated men were also at increased risk of stroke incidence (relative risk, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.12, 4.35), but not incidence of non-fatal myocardial infarction. CONCLUSIONS: Social networks were associated with lower total mortality by reducing deaths from cardiovascular disease and accidents/suicides. Strong social networks were associated with reduced incidence of stroke, though not of coronary heart disease. However, social networks may assist in prolonging the survival of men with established coronary heart disease.
Authors:
I Kawachi; G A Colditz; A Ascherio; E B Rimm; E Giovannucci; M J Stampfer; W C Willett
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of epidemiology and community health     Volume:  50     ISSN:  0143-005X     ISO Abbreviation:  J Epidemiol Community Health     Publication Date:  1996 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1997-06-26     Completed Date:  1997-06-26     Revised Date:  2009-11-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7909766     Medline TA:  J Epidemiol Community Health     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  245-51     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health and Social Behavior, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Accidents / mortality
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases / mortality*
Cerebrovascular Disorders / mortality
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease / mortality
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension / mortality
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms / mortality
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Smoking
Social Support*
Suicide
United States / epidemiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
CA 55705/CA/NCI NIH HHS; HL 35464/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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