Document Detail


A prospective randomized study comparing misoprostol and oxytocin for premature rupture of membranes at term.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16753768     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this randomized trial was to compare the efficacy and safety of vaginal misoprostol and oxytocin for cervical ripening and labor induction in patients with premature rupture of membrane (PROM) at term. METHODS: Ninety-seven women with PROM at term were assigned randomly to receive intravaginal misoprostol or oxytocin. The primary outcome measure was the induction-delivery interval. Secondary outcomes included the number of women who delivered vaginally within 12 hours of the start of the induction in the two groups, the cesarean, hyperstimulation, and failed induction rates, the mode of delivery, and the neonatal outcome. RESULTS: Forty-eight women were assigned to intravaginal misoprostol and 49 to oxytocin administration. The mean interval from induction to delivery was 10.61 +/- 2.45 hours in the misoprostol group and 11.57 +/- 1.91 hours in the oxytocin group (p = 0.063). The rates of vaginal delivery were 83.3% and 87.7% and cesarean delivery were 16.7% and 8.2% in the misoprostol and oxytocin groups, respectively. Neonatal outcomes were not significantly different. Of the cases, 8.3% in the misoprostol group and 8.2% in the oxytocin group revealed uterine contraction abnormalities. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that, intravaginally, misoprostol results in a similar interval from induction of labor to delivery when compared to oxytocin.
Authors:
Sahin Zeteroğlu; Yaprak Engin-Ustün; Yusuf Ustün; Mehmet Güvercinçi; Güler Sahin; Mansur Kamaci
Related Documents :
7326378 - Maternal positions in labor: analysis in relation to comfort and efficiency.
20173318 - Ultrasound in labor and delivery.
86468 - A comparative study of the efficiency of hydroxyprogesterone caproate and of chlormadin...
20486068 - Mode of delivery in women with antepartum fetal death and prior cesarean delivery.
17287108 - Intra-uterine growth retardation after prenatal administration of ginkgo biloba to rats.
24397798 - Twin pregnancy after kidney transplantation: what's on? a case report and review of lit...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians     Volume:  19     ISSN:  1476-7058     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med.     Publication Date:  2006 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-06-06     Completed Date:  2006-11-22     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101136916     Medline TA:  J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  283-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Yüzüncü Yil University, Van, Turkey. sahinzeter@yahoo.com
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Administration, Intravaginal
Adult
Cesarean Section / statistics & numerical data
Delivery, Obstetric / statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture / therapy*
Gestational Age
Humans
Labor, Induced / methods*
Misoprostol / administration & dosage*,  adverse effects
Oxytocics / administration & dosage*,  adverse effects
Oxytocin / administration & dosage*,  adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Oxytocics; 50-56-6/Oxytocin; 59122-46-2/Misoprostol

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Effect of L-arginine on blood pressure in pregnancy-induced hypertension: a randomized placebo-contr...
Next Document:  Fetal acidemia and electronic fetal heart rate patterns: is there evidence of an association?