Document Detail


A prenotification letter increased initial response, whereas sender did not affect response rates.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23347856     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To find ways to improve response rates of medical and health surveys. We investigated whether a prenotification letter instead of a second reminder and varying senders of the questionnaires would affect response rates.
STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We present the results of two studies. In the first study, four groups were compared that either received a prenotification letter (group 1 and 2) or a second reminder letter (group 3 and 4); received the questionnaire from either a research institute (group 1 and 3) or a health insurance company (HIC; group 2 and 4). In the second study, we compared two groups that received the questionnaire sent by either a HIC or a hospital. Response rates, response speed, respondent characteristics, item nonresponse, and mean scores on quality aspects and global ratings were compared.
RESULTS: Response rates did not differ significantly between groups. Prenotification groups returned their questionnaires faster. No other significant differences were found for response speed, respondent characteristics, item nonresponse, or mean scores.
CONCLUSION: A prenotification letter does only increase initial response speed and does not increase total response rates. A prenotification letter should be considered when quick response is desirable. Varying senders had no effect on response rates.
Authors:
Laura Koopman; Lea C G Donselaar; Jany J Rademakers; Michelle Hendriks
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of clinical epidemiology     Volume:  66     ISSN:  1878-5921     ISO Abbreviation:  J Clin Epidemiol     Publication Date:  2013 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-25     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8801383     Medline TA:  J Clin Epidemiol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  340-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Patient Centered Care, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, P.O. Box 1568, 3500 BN Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: l.koopman@nivel.nl.
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From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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