Document Detail


A preliminary investigation into the magnitude of effect of lumbar extension exercises and a segmental rotatory manipulation on sympathetic nervous system activity.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21106433     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Two commonly utilised manual therapy techniques; McKenzie's lumbar extension exercises (EE); and segmental rotational grade V manipulation were investigated to determine their magnitude of neurophysiological effect. Proxy measures of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity (skin conductance) were utilised to ascertaining neurophysiological response. This study determined the neurological effects of these two treatment techniques in addition to establishing the Biopac System as a reliable measure of neurophysiological changes. A quasi-experimental, independent group's design was utilised, with random allocation of 50 normal, healthy participants into a manipulation or an EE group. Neurophysiological measurements of skin conductance were taken in the lower limbs before, during and after the administration of the techniques. Results were converted into percentage change calculations for the intervention and the post-intervention periods. Both treatments increased SNS activity during the intervention period, 63% for the manipulation group (p = 0.0005) and 42% for EE group (p = 0.0005) with the manipulative technique having significantly greater effect (p = 0.012). Further analysis of the manipulation group found no difference between the 'opening' and the 'closing' side of the technique (p = 0.76). Biopac System is a reliable method for measuring SNS activity with minimum measurement variability. Preliminary evidence now exists supporting the neurophysiological effects of two lumbar techniques.
Authors:
Jo Perry; Ann Green; Sally Singh; Paul Watson
Related Documents :
18780583 - A comprehensive review of the psychological effects of brainwave entrainment.
15353613 - Evidence-based recommendations for the role of exercise in the management of osteoarthr...
18577773 - Amino acids and the brain: do they play a role in "central fatigue"?
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2010-11-23
Journal Detail:
Title:  Manual therapy     Volume:  16     ISSN:  1532-2769     ISO Abbreviation:  Man Ther     Publication Date:  2011 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-02-07     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9610924     Medline TA:  Man Ther     Country:  Scotland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  190-5     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Coventry University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Urban trees and the risk of poor birth outcomes.
Next Document:  Distinct roles of IL-22 in human psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease.