Document Detail


A population-based study of the frequency of corticosteroid resistance and dependence in pediatric patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17119382     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The goal of this study was to examine the 1-year outcome after the first course of systemic corticosteroids in an inception cohort of pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: All Olmsted County (Minnesota) residents diagnosed with Crohn's disease (n = 50) or ulcerative colitis (n = 36) before 19 years of age from 1940 to 2001 were identified. Outcomes at 30 days and 1 year after the initial course of corticosteroids were recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients with Crohn's disease (65%) and 14 with ulcerative colitis (44%) were treated with corticosteroids before age 19. Thirty-day outcomes for corticosteroid-treated Crohn's disease were complete remission in 16 (62%), partial remission in 7 (27%), and no response in 3 (12%), with 2 of these patients requiring surgery. Thirty-day outcomes for treated ulcerative colitis were complete remission in 7 (50%), partial remission in 4 (29%), and no response in 3 (21%). One-year outcomes for Crohn's disease were prolonged response in 11 (42%) and corticosteroid dependence in 8 (31%), whereas 7 (27%) were postsurgical. One-year outcomes for ulcerative colitis were prolonged response in 8 (57%) and corticosteroid dependence in 2 (14%), whereas 4 (29%) were postsurgical. CONCLUSIONS: Most pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease initially responded to corticosteroids. However, after 1 year, 58% of pediatric patients with Crohn's disease and 43% of pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis either were steroid dependent or required surgery. This finding emphasizes the need for early steroid-sparing medications in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.
Authors:
Jeanne Tung; Edward V Loftus; Deborah K Freese; Mounif El-Youssef; Alan R Zinsmeister; L Joseph Melton; W Scott Harmsen; William J Sandborn; William A Faubion
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Inflammatory bowel diseases     Volume:  12     ISSN:  1078-0998     ISO Abbreviation:  Inflamm. Bowel Dis.     Publication Date:  2006 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-11-22     Completed Date:  2007-02-07     Revised Date:  2007-12-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9508162     Medline TA:  Inflamm Bowel Dis     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1093-100     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Pediatrics, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones / pharmacology*
Child
Child, Preschool
Colitis, Ulcerative / drug therapy*,  surgery
Crohn Disease / drug therapy*,  surgery
Drug Resistance*
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Regression Analysis
Risk Factors
Treatment Outcome
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AR 30582/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Adrenal Cortex Hormones

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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