Document Detail


A multicontext approach to promoting transfer of strategy use and self regulation after brain injury: An exploratory study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20235769     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND/AIM: Persons with brain injury frequently demonstrate decreased ability to monitor and apply strategies learned in treatment to everyday situations. The aim of this study is to refine, explore and provide preliminary testing of the multicontext approach in promoting strategy use across situations and increasing self-regulation, awareness and functional performance.
METHODS: This study used a single-subject design with repeated measures pre- and post-intervention, with data analysed descriptively and graphically. Four persons with difficulty following multi-step directions, 3-5 years post-TBI, received a nine session intervention programme. Outcome measures included the Awareness Questionnaire, Self-Regulation Skills Interview, Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Multiple Errands Test and an Executive Function Performance Test sub-task. The process of change within each treatment session was examined with strategy and awareness ratings.
RESULTS: All participants demonstrated positive changes in self-regulatory skills and strategy use that was observed across tasks. As expected, general awareness of deficits remained unchanged. Examination of individual participants revealed important, varying patterns of change in strategy use, learning transfer and self-awareness across intervention.
CONCLUSIONS: Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility and efficacy of the multicontext approach in promoting transfer of strategy use to enhance functional performance and selective aspects of awareness. Further investigation, including a larger controlled study, is needed to confirm or limit these observations.
Authors:
Joan Toglia; Mark V Johnston; Yael Goverover; Barry Dain
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Brain injury     Volume:  24     ISSN:  1362-301X     ISO Abbreviation:  Brain Inj     Publication Date:  2010  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-03-18     Completed Date:  2010-08-13     Revised Date:  2014-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8710358     Medline TA:  Brain Inj     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  664-77     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Activities of Daily Living / psychology*
Adult
Brain Injuries / physiopathology,  psychology,  rehabilitation*
Cognition Disorders / physiopathology,  psychology,  rehabilitation*
Cognitive Therapy
Executive Function / physiology*
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Self Concept
Social Control, Informal
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HD035965/HD/NICHD NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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