Document Detail


The mental health and psychosocial adjustment of Cuban immigrants in south Florida.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20643498     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Given documented variation in pre-migration and migration-related experiences, Cuban immigrants in the U.S. who arrived during or subsequent to 1980 may be disadvantaged in mental health and psychosocial adjustment relative to earlier arrivals. Using wave 1 of the Physical Challenge and Health study, we compare earlier and later arriving immigrants in levels of depression, anxiety, and self-esteem and test whether adversity and social support, acculturation-related factors, or pre-migration conditions account for any differences observed among a sample of adults living in South Florida (N = 191). Bivariate analyses reveal that later arrivals are relatively disadvantaged in anxiety and self-esteem and marginally so in depression. While later arrivals do not report more adversity in the U.S., they have lower levels of family support to cope with any adversity experienced. Later arrivals are also less likely to interview in English or to have a strong American identity, and they were more likely to have arrived as adults. Relative disadvantages in anxiety and self-esteem are best explained by indicators of acculturation and family support. Policies and programs that address acculturation difficulties and increase family support could improve the health and adjustment of these and similar immigrants.
Authors:
Andrew M Cislo; Naomi J Spence; Mathew D Gayman
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2010-06-16
Journal Detail:
Title:  Social science & medicine (1982)     Volume:  71     ISSN:  1873-5347     ISO Abbreviation:  Soc Sci Med     Publication Date:  2010 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-08-16     Completed Date:  2010-09-09     Revised Date:  2013-05-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8303205     Medline TA:  Soc Sci Med     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1173-81     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7590, United States. acislo@schsr.unc.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological*
Adult
Anxiety / epidemiology
Cuba / ethnology
Depression / epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants / psychology*,  statistics & numerical data
Female
Florida / epidemiology
Health Status Disparities*
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Health*
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prejudice
Self Concept
Social Adjustment*
Social Support
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 DA013292-01/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA13292/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R24 HD050924-07/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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