Document Detail


A membranous spindle matrix orchestrates cell division.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20520622     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Eukaryotic cell division uses morphologically different forms of mitosis, referred to as open, partially open and closed mitosis, for accurate chromosome segregation and proper partitioning of other cellular components such as endomembranes and cell fate determinants. Recent studies suggest that the spindle matrix provides a conserved strategy to coordinate the segregation of genetic material and the partitioning of the rest of the cellular contents in all three forms of mitosis.
Authors:
Yixian Zheng
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Review     Date:  2010-06-03
Journal Detail:
Title:  Nature reviews. Molecular cell biology     Volume:  11     ISSN:  1471-0080     ISO Abbreviation:  Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol.     Publication Date:  2010 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-06-23     Completed Date:  2010-07-07     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100962782     Medline TA:  Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  529-35     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institute for Science, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. zheng@ciwemb.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Cell Division / genetics,  physiology*
Chromosome Segregation / genetics,  physiology
Humans
Microtubules / genetics,  metabolism
Mitotic Spindle Apparatus / genetics,  metabolism*
Models, Biological
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
GM056312/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS; //Howard Hughes Medical Institute

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