Document Detail


The mechanism and regulation of fat mobilization from adipose tissue: desnutrin, a newly discovered lipolytic enzyme.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15971411     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A new member of a family of proteins functioning in the regulation of lipolysis in adipose tissue has been discovered and named "desnutrin." Desnutrin is transiently induced by fasting and decreased by re-feeding. A close homolog, termed adiponutrin, has the opposite expression pattern, being induced by feeding and disappearing upon fasting. Desnutrin functions by acting as the first enzyme in lipolysis, hydrolyzing triglycerides to diglycerides, whereas the well-known hormone-sensitive lipase takes the diglycerides to monoglycerides and on to free fatty acids.
Authors:
George Wolf
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Nutrition reviews     Volume:  63     ISSN:  0029-6643     ISO Abbreviation:  Nutr. Rev.     Publication Date:  2005 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-06-23     Completed Date:  2005-10-17     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376405     Medline TA:  Nutr Rev     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  166-70     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adipose Tissue / metabolism*
Animals
Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases / metabolism*
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified / blood*
Humans
Lipid Mobilization / physiology*
Lipolysis / physiology
Membrane Proteins / metabolism
Mice
Triglycerides / metabolism
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Fatty Acids, Nonesterified; 0/Membrane Proteins; 0/Triglycerides; 0/adiponutrin; EC 3.1.1.-/Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases; EC 3.1.1.1/desnutrin protein, mouse

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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