Document Detail


A low-fat dietary pattern and risk of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women: the Women's Health Initiative.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22633601     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Nutrition plays an important role in metabolic syndrome etiology. We examined whether the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Dietary Modification Trial influenced metabolic syndrome risk.
MATERIALS/METHODS: 48,835 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 years were randomized to a low-fat (20% energy from fat) diet (intervention) or usual diet (comparison) for a mean of 8.1 years. Blood pressure, waist circumference and fasting blood measures of glucose, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were measured on a subsample (n=2816) at baseline and years 1, 3 and 6 post-randomization. Logistic regression estimated associations of the intervention with metabolic syndrome risk and use of cholesterol-lowering and hypertension medications. Multivariate linear regression tested associations between the intervention and metabolic syndrome components.
RESULTS: At year 3, but not years 1 or 6, women in the intervention group (vs. comparison) had a non-statistically significant lower risk of metabolic syndrome (OR=0.83, 95%CI 0.59-1.18). Linear regression models simultaneously modeling the five metabolic syndrome components revealed significant associations of the intervention with metabolic syndrome at year 1 (p<0.0001), but not years 3 (p=0.19) and 6 (p=0.17). Analyses restricted to intervention-adherent participants strengthened associations at years 3 (p=0.05) and 6 (p=0.06). Cholesterol-lowering and hypertension medication use was 19% lower at year 1 for intervention vs. comparison group women (OR=0.81, 95% CI 0.60-1.09).Over the entire trial, fewer intervention vs. comparison participants used these medications (26.0% vs. 29.9%), although results were not statistically significant (p=0.89).
CONCLUSIONS: The WHI low-fat diet may influence metabolic syndrome risk and decrease use of hypertension and cholesterol-lowering medications. Findings have potential for meaningful clinical translation.
Authors:
Marian L Neuhouser; Barbara Howard; Jingmin Lu; Lesley F Tinker; Linda Van Horn; Bette Caan; Thomas Rohan; Marcia L Stefanick; Cynthia A Thomson
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2012-05-26
Journal Detail:
Title:  Metabolism: clinical and experimental     Volume:  61     ISSN:  1532-8600     ISO Abbreviation:  Metab. Clin. Exp.     Publication Date:  2012 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-23     Completed Date:  2012-12-28     Revised Date:  2013-11-06    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0375267     Medline TA:  Metabolism     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1572-81     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98109-1024, USA. mneuhous@fhcrc.org
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Dietary Fats / administration & dosage*
Female
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X / epidemiology*
Middle Aged
Postmenopause*
Risk Factors
Women's Health*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
N01WH22110/WH/WHI NIH HHS; P30 CA015704/CA/NCI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dietary Fats
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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