Document Detail


A literature review of the effectiveness of ginger in alleviating mild-to-moderate nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15637501     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Mild-to-moderate nausea and vomiting of pregnancy affects up to 80% of all pregnancies. Concern about antiemetic use and the time-limited nature of symptoms has restrained the development of effective treatment approaches, yet supportive, dietary, and lifestyle changes may be ineffective. This article reviews 4 recent well-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical studies that provide convincing evidence for the effectiveness of ginger in treating nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. It also provides a dosage update for the various forms of ginger.
Authors:
Eva Bryer
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of midwifery & women's health     Volume:  50     ISSN:  1526-9523     ISO Abbreviation:  J Midwifery Womens Health     Publication Date:    2005 Jan-Feb
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-01-07     Completed Date:  2005-03-11     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100909407     Medline TA:  J Midwifery Womens Health     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e1-3     Citation Subset:  IM; N    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Administration, Oral
Adult
Antiemetics / administration & dosage,  therapeutic use*
Beverages
Dosage Forms
Double-Blind Method
Female
Ginger*
Humans
Morning Sickness / drug therapy*,  prevention & control
Pregnancy
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Antiemetics; 0/Dosage Forms

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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