Document Detail


An international data analysis on the level of maternal and child health in relation to socioeconomic factors.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11314858     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
International data on health and socioeconomic factors were analyzed to understand the trends and the determinants of maternal and infant mortality in the late years. Multivariate analyses were carried out to summarize the structure of the data. Multiple regression analyses were also carried out with these two mortality rates as dependent variables. The range of independent variables included health resource availability, immunization, GNP, illiteracy rates, distribution in working area, the indicators of living standards such as percentage of telephone lines and television sets per capita and the percentages of working children, population with access to safe water and sanitation, people living in urban areas, among others. In the preliminary analysis the indicators of living standards appeared highly correlated to maternal and infant mortality. Working area (industrial or agricultural) showed also an important correlation. In factor analysis indirect variables (economic and living condition) were summarized into two factors. Two regression analyses were executed. In the first the variables were used directly, while factors obtained by the factor analysis were used in the second. The second analysis confirmed the previous analysis: fertility rate, immunization and urbanization appeared as determinants of maternal mortality. Birth rate, percentage of females working in agriculture and total illiteracy appeared as determinants of infant mortality. The factors extracted in the factor analysis made a significant contribution to the second regression analysis. We concluded: 1) The factors extracted by factor analyses from indirect variables had high explanatory ability on infant mortality rates, 2) The presence of immunization together with birth rate and fertility rate in the regression models pointed out the importance of investing in birth rate reduction and disease prevention methods.
Authors:
L R Herrera; M Kakehashi
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Hiroshima journal of medical sciences     Volume:  50     ISSN:  0018-2052     ISO Abbreviation:  Hiroshima J. Med. Sci.     Publication Date:  2001 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-04-20     Completed Date:  2001-05-24     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0421060     Medline TA:  Hiroshima J Med Sci     Country:  Japan    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  9-16     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Institute of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi, Japan.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Child
Child Welfare
Cluster Analysis
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infant
Infant Mortality / trends*
Maternal Mortality / trends*
Maternal Welfare
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Sanitation
Social Class*
Socioeconomic Factors
Water Supply
World Health*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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