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The influence of pregnancy on systemic immunity.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22447351     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Adaptations in maternal systemic immunity are presumed to be responsible for observed alterations in disease susceptibility and severity as pregnancy progresses. Epidemiological evidence as well as animal studies have shown that influenza infections are more severe during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, resulting in greater morbidity and mortality, although the reason for this is still unclear. Our laboratory has taken advantage of 20 years of experience studying the murine immune response to respiratory viruses to address questions of altered immunity during pregnancy. With clinical studies and unique animal model systems, we are working to define the mechanisms responsible for altered immune responses to influenza infection during pregnancy and what roles hormones such as estrogen or progesterone play in these alterations.
Authors:
Michael Pazos; Rhoda S Sperling; Thomas M Moran; Thomas A Kraus
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-3-24
Journal Detail:
Title:  Immunologic research     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1559-0755     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-3-26     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8611087     Medline TA:  Immunol Res     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 1 Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1124, New York, NY, 10029, USA.
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