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The influence of individual motor imagery ability on cerebral recruitment during gait imagery.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23015531     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Motor imagery (MI) is often used in combination with neuroimaging techniques to study the cognitive control of gait. However, imagery ability (IA) varies widely across individuals, potentially influencing the pattern of cerebral recruitment during MI. The aim of the current study was to investigate this effect of IA on the neural correlates of gait control using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy young subjects were subdivided into a good and bad imagers group, on the basis of their performance on two mental chronometry tests. For the whole group, MI activated a bilateral network of areas highly consistent with previous studies, encompassing primary motor cortex (BA 4), supplementary motor area, and other frontal and parietal areas, anterior insula, and cerebellum. Compared to bad imagers, good imagers showed higher activation in the right BA 4, left prefrontal cortex (BA 10), right thalamus, and bilateral cerebellum. Good imagers thus appear better able to recruit motor areas during MI, but also activate a prefrontal executive area (BA 10), which integrates information from the body and the environment and participates in higher-order gait control. These differences were found even though the two groups did not differ in other imagery abilities according to a standard questionnaire for vividness of motor and visual imagery. Future studies on MI should take into account these effects, and control for IA when comparing different populations, using appropriate measures. A better understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie MI ability is crucial to accurately evaluate locomotor skills in clinical measures and neurorehabilitation techniques. Hum Brain Mapp, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Authors:
Marian van der Meulen; Gilles Allali; Sebastian W Rieger; Frédéric Assal; Patrik Vuilleumier
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-9-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Human brain mapping     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1097-0193     ISO Abbreviation:  Hum Brain Mapp     Publication Date:  2012 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-9-27     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9419065     Medline TA:  Hum Brain Mapp     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland; Laboratory for Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, Department of Neurosciences, University of Geneva, Switzerland. marian.vandermeulen@uni.lu.
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