Document Detail


The influence of cereal and dairy consumption on the Irish diet: implications for developing food-based dietary guidelines.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15918919     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: To estimate the intakes of cereal and dairy products and their contribution to nutrient intakes in men and women from the Republic of Ireland with a view to formulating food-based dietary guidelines. DESIGN: The North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey established a database of habitual food and drink consumption using a 7-day food diary. From this database all cereal and dairy products from recipes and identifiable sources were identified and a new database was generated from which analysis of the role of cereal and dairy products in the diet was carried out. RESULTS: Almost 100% of the population consumed cereal and dairy products over the course of the survey week. In general, men consumed significantly more cereal and dairy products than did women (P<0.05). Cereal products made an important contribution to the mean daily intakes of energy (26%), protein (21%), fat (13%), carbohydrate (41%), fibre (45%), iron (43%) and folate (27%). Dairy products also contributed largely to the mean daily intakes of energy (11%), protein (14%), fat (17%), calcium (48%), phosphorus (24%) and vitamin A (27%). Analysis of nutrient intakes across tertiles of cereal and dairy consumption showed that high consumers of wholemeal bread, breakfast cereals, reduced-fat milk and yoghurt had lower fat and higher carbohydrate, fibre and micronutrient intakes than low consumers of these foods. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from the present study could be used to develop effective health strategies to implement changes in cereal and dairy consumption that could alter fat, fibre and micronutrient intakes in the diet.
Authors:
S J Burke; M J Gibney; N A O'Dwyer; S N McCarthy
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Public health nutrition     Volume:  8     ISSN:  1368-9800     ISO Abbreviation:  Public Health Nutr     Publication Date:  2005 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-05-27     Completed Date:  2005-08-18     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9808463     Medline TA:  Public Health Nutr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  227-37     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St. James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Republic of Ireland. burkesj@tcd.ie
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Cereals*
Dairy Products*
Diet Records
Dietary Fats / analysis
Dietary Fiber / analysis
Female
Food Habits*
Humans
Ireland
Male
Micronutrients*
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy*
Nutrition Surveys
Sex Factors
Statistics, Nonparametric
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dietary Fats; 0/Micronutrients

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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