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The impact of young onset dementia on the family: a literature review.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20735892     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
ABSTRACTBackground: The needs of younger people with dementia have become increasingly recognized in service development. However, little is known about the impact of a diagnosis of young onset dementia on people aged under 65 years and their families. This paper reviews the literature on the experiences of younger people with dementia and their families in the U.K., and outcomes for carers.Methods: Twenty-six studies, encompassing a variety of themes concerning this population, were reviewed following a systematic literature search.Results: Results are divided into the impact on the individual and the impact on the family, specifically carer outcomes and the impact on children.Conclusions: The studies reviewed reveal a number of negative outcomes for the individual and carers, and highlight the need for further research.
Authors:
Emma Svanberg; Aimee Spector; Joshua Stott
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2010-08-25
Journal Detail:
Title:  International psychogeriatrics / IPA     Volume:  23     ISSN:  1741-203X     ISO Abbreviation:  Int Psychogeriatr     Publication Date:  2011 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-02-23     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9007918     Medline TA:  Int Psychogeriatr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  356-71     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Primary Care Psychology and Counselling Service, Tower Hamlets, London, U.K.
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From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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