Document Detail


The impact of velocity of movement on performance factors in resistance exercise.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17194227     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a very slow (VS) velocity and a self-selected volitional (VOL) velocity at varying intensities on repetition number, peak force, peak power, and total volume in the squat and shoulder press exercises. On separate testing days, 9 resistance trained men (age: 23.9 +/- 2.5 years; height: 174.8 +/- 6.5 cm; body mass: 80.1 +/- 12.4 kg) performed a squat (SQ) and shoulder press (SP) exercise at 60 or 80% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) at either VOL or VS (10-second eccentric and 10-second concentric actions) velocity for as many repetitions as possible. Force, power, and volume (repetitions x kg) were also determined. Subjects performed significantly fewer repetitions (p < or = 0.05) in the VS exercises (60% VS SQ 5 +/- 1 vs. VOL SQ 24 +/- 2; 80% VS SQ 2 +/- 0 vs. VOL SQ 12 +/- 1; 60% VS SP 4 +/- 1 vs. VOL SP 14 +/- 2; 80% VS SP 1 +/- 0 vs. VOL SP 6 +/- 1). Peak force and power were significantly higher at the VOL speed (peak force [in newtons]: 60% VS SQ 564.4 +/- 77.3 vs. VOL SQ 1229.0 +/- 134.9 N; 80% VS SQ 457.3 +/- 27.9 vs. VOL SQ 1059.3 +/- 104.7 N; 60% VS SP 321.6 +/- 37.8 vs. VOL SP 940.7 +/- 144.8 N; 80% VS SP 296.5 +/- 24.7 vs. VOL SP 702.5 +/- 57.7 N; and peak power [in watts]: 60% VS SQ 271.2 +/- 40.1 vs. VOL SQ 783.2 +/- 129.1 W; 80% VS SQ 229.3 +/- 49.5 vs. VOL SQ 520.2 +/- 85.8 W; 60% VS SP 91.3 +/- 21.9 vs. VOL SP 706.6 +/- 151.4 W; 80% VS SP 78.1 +/- 19.8 vs. VOL SP 277.6 +/- 46.4 W). VOL speed elicited higher total volume than the VS velocity. The results of this study indicate that a VS velocity may not elicit appropriate levels of force, power, or volume to optimize strength and athletic performance.
Authors:
Disa L Hatfield; William J Kraemer; Barry A Spiering; Keijo Häkkinen; Jeff S Volek; Tomoko Shimano; Luuk P B Spreuwenberg; Ricardo Silvestre; Jakob L Vingren; Maren S Fragala; Ana L Gómez; Steven J Fleck; Robert U Newton; Carl M Maresh
Related Documents :
19461537 - Changes of pedaling technique and muscle coordination during an exhaustive exercise.
18978627 - Kinetic comparison of free weight and machine power cleans.
23377837 - Effects of running and walking on osteoarthritis and hip replacement risk.
23640317 - Comparison of muscle activities of abductor hallucis and adductor hallucis between the ...
19508807 - Update on proprioception: considerations for dance education.
3800617 - Maximal response of wheelchair-confined subjects to four types of arm exercise.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1064-8011     ISO Abbreviation:  J Strength Cond Res     Publication Date:  2006 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-12-29     Completed Date:  2007-01-30     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9415084     Medline TA:  J Strength Cond Res     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  760-6     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
Affiliation:
Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Biomechanics
Exercise / physiology*
Humans
Male
Muscle, Skeletal / physiology*
Physical Fitness / physiology*
Shoulder / physiology
Weight Lifting / physiology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Stability of a practical measure of recovery from resistance training.
Next Document:  Variations in heart rate at blood lactate threshold due to exercise mode in elite cross-country skie...