Document Detail


The impact of condom prices on sales in social marketing programs.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8209395     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The issue of pricing contraceptives in family planning programs is becoming more and more important. What is the relationship between consumer prices and demand, and how can we strike the correct balance between the two? This report examines the correlation between consumer prices for condoms, expressed as a percentage of per-capita gross national product, and per-capita sales of condoms in 24 social marketing programs. The correlation that emerges is strong and negative: Even when the data are controlled for age of program and other independent variables, there is a clear negative correlation between prices and contraceptive sales in these programs. The conclusion is clear that condom prices must be set very low--well below the equivalent of 1 percent of per-capita gross national product for a year's supply--in order to achieve satisfactory prevalence for condoms in either a family-planning or an AIDS-prevention context.
The issue of pricing contraceptives in family planning programs is gaining importance. The author explores and reports on the correlation between consumer prices for condoms, expressed as a percentage of per-capita gross national product, and per-capita sales of condoms in 24 social marketing programs. Programs for 1991 are considered in each of Costa Rica, Jamaica, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, El Salvador, Ghana, Guatemala, Colombia, Honduras, Zimbabwe, Morocco, Indonesia, Kenya, Haiti, Nigeria, Zaire, India, Cameroon, Nepal, Egypt, and the Dominican Republic; two were considered in Mexico. These programs had been functioning at a distribution level of at least 150,000 condoms/annum for a minimum of three years. Controlling for program age and other independent variables, the analysis revealed a clear negative correlation between prices and contraceptive sales in the programs. Condom prices must be set well below the equivalent of 1% of per-capita gross national product for a year's supply. If not, satisfactory prevalences of condoms will be realized in neither family planning nor AIDS-prevention contexts.
Authors:
P D Harvey
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Studies in family planning     Volume:  25     ISSN:  0039-3665     ISO Abbreviation:  Stud Fam Plann     Publication Date:    1994 Jan-Feb
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1994-07-13     Completed Date:  1994-07-13     Revised Date:  2005-11-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7810364     Medline TA:  Stud Fam Plann     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  52-8     Citation Subset:  IM; J; X    
Affiliation:
DKT International, Washington, DC 20036.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome / prevention & control
Bias (Epidemiology)
Condoms / economics*,  trends,  utilization*
Cost Control
Costs and Cost Analysis
Family Planning Services / economics*,  trends
Forecasting
Humans
Marketing of Health Services / economics*,  trends
Time Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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