Document Detail


The impact of the circadian timing system on cardiovascular and metabolic function.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22877674     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Epidemiological studies show that adverse cardiovascular events peak in the morning (i.e., between 6 AM and noon) and that shift work is associated with cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. The endogenous circadian timing system modulates certain cardiovascular risk markers to be highest (e.g., cortisol, nonlinear dynamic heart rate control, and platelet activation) or to respond most unfavorably to stressors such as exercise (e.g., epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vagal cardiac modulation) at an internal body time corresponding to the time of day when adverse cardiovascular events most likely occur. This indicates that the circadian timing system and its interaction with external cardiovascular stressors (e.g., physical activity) could contribute to the morning peak in adverse cardiovascular events. Moreover, circadian misalignment and simulated night work have adverse effects on cardiovascular and metabolic function. This suggests that misalignment between the behavioral cycle and the circadian timing system in shift workers contributes to that population's increased risk for cardiometabolic disease.
Authors:
Christopher J Morris; Jessica N Yang; Frank A J L Scheer
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Progress in brain research     Volume:  199     ISSN:  1875-7855     ISO Abbreviation:  Prog. Brain Res.     Publication Date:  2012  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-08-10     Completed Date:  2013-01-15     Revised Date:  2013-07-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376441     Medline TA:  Prog Brain Res     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  337-58     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. cjmorris@rics.bwh.harvard.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Cardiovascular Diseases / etiology*
Chronobiology Disorders / complications*
Circadian Clocks / physiology*
Humans
Metabolic Diseases / etiology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
P30 HL101299/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; P30-HL101299/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL094806/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL094806/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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