Document Detail


The impact of cesarean section on offspring overweight and obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23207407     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Studies have reported inconsistent results concerning the association of cesarean section with offspring obesity. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine whether cesarean section increases the risk of later overweight and obesity. Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science were searched using different combinations of two groups of keywords: 'cesarean' and 'overweight/obesity'. Cohort or case-control studies that reported the association of cesarean section with childhood (3-8 years), adolescence (9-18 years) and/or adult (>19 years) overweight/obesity were eligible. Where possible, adjusted risk estimates were pooled using a random effects model; otherwise unadjusted estimates were pooled. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed with I(2) statistics; the values of 25%, 50% and 75% were considered to indicate low, medium and high heterogeneity, respectively. We conducted a subgroup analysis to identify the sources of heterogeneity according to study quality defined on the basis of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. In total, two case-control and seven cohort studies were identified for the literature review and 15 separate risk estimates were included in the meta-analysis. The overall pooled odds ratio (OR) of overweight/obesity for offspring delivered by cesarean section compared with those born vaginally was 1.33 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19, 1.48; I(2)=63%); the OR was 1.32 (1.15, 1.51) for children, 1.24 (1.00, 1.54) for adolescents and 1.50 (1.02, 2.20) for adults. In subgroup analysis, the overall pooled OR was 1.18 (1.09, 1.27; I(2)=29%) for high-quality studies and 1.78 (1.43, 2.22; I(2)=24%) for medium-quality (P for interaction=0.0005); no low-quality studies were identified. The ORs for children, adolescents and adults all tended to be lower for high-quality studies compared with medium-quality studies. Our results indicated that cesarean section was moderately associated with offspring overweight and obesity. This finding has public health implications, given the increase in cesarean births in many countries.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 4 December 2012; doi:10.1038/ijo.2012.195.
Authors:
H-T Li; Y-B Zhou; J-M Liu
Related Documents :
23497837 - Relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder and type 2 diabetes in a population-...
3540297 - Relationship of migraine headache and stroke to oral contraceptive use.
22949577 - Preliminary evidence that adherence to counseling mediates the effects of pretreatment ...
23538637 - Relationships between the built environment and walking and weight status among older w...
12076237 - Nut consumption and decreased risk of sudden cardiac death in the physicians' health st...
21745097 - Mid-age women's consultations with acupuncturists: a longitudinal analysis of 11,200 wo...
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-12-04
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of obesity (2005)     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1476-5497     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Obes (Lond)     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101256108     Medline TA:  Int J Obes (Lond)     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
1] Institute of Reproductive and Child Health/Ministry of Health Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China [2] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Vitamin A supplementation in early life affects later response to an obesogenic diet in rats.
Next Document:  The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen.