Document Detail


The growth and nutritional status of the breast-fed infant.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9363424     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The literature on the relationship between early infant feeding and growth shows that after the first 3 or 4 months, breast-fed infants in the developed world are lighter than formula-fed infants with markedly lower adiposity. There is some evidence of a slightly lower rate of linear growth over the first year or so. These differences in weight and length do not apparently persist beyond the first few years of life. In the developing world the situation is very different. The growth curves of breast-fed infants of malnourished mothers may falter between the third and sixth month of life. However, the generally poor quality of the supplementary foods offered in the developing world and the increased risk of diarrhoeal infections mean that supplementary feeding before the age of 6 months is unlikely to lead to a growth advantage and may well lead to growth faltering.
A review of the research literature on the relationship between early infant feeding and growth indicates that, after the first 3 or 4 months, breast-fed infants in developed countries are lighter than formula-fed infants and have markedly lower adiposity. There is some evidence of a slightly lower rate of linear growth over the first year of life, but any differences in weight and height do not persist beyond this point. Very different trends are found in developing countries. The growth curves of breast-fed infants of malnourished mothers may falter between the third and sixth months of life. However, given the generally poor quality of the supplementary food offered in developing countries and the increased risk of diarrheal infections, supplementary feeding before 6 months of age is unlikely to produce a growth advantage and may well lead to growth faltering. After 6 months, the growth advantage of supplementary feeding will be dependent on the nutritional quality of the weaning food, the effect on the child's breast milk intake, and the risk of infection. It is probable that the observed association between prolonged breast feeding and malnutrition arises from confounding factors such as poverty and the delayed weaning of sickly children. Other issues addressed in this review include the energy requirements of breast-fed infants, colostrum feeding, and nutritional status in relation to vitamin and mineral intake.
Authors:
I S Rogers; P M Emmett; J Golding
Related Documents :
15686844 - Culture-independent analysis of fecal microbiota in infants, with special reference to ...
3946324 - Early suckling and prolonged breast-feeding.
12305424 - Universalizing breast feeding in a community.
3819064 - Zinc deficiency in two full-term breast-fed infants.
10709794 - Positive versus negative framing of a hypothetical infant immunization: the influence o...
19621454 - Urine concentrating ability in infants with sickle cell disease: baseline data from the...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Early human development     Volume:  49 Suppl     ISSN:  0378-3782     ISO Abbreviation:  Early Hum. Dev.     Publication Date:  1997 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1997-12-16     Completed Date:  1997-12-16     Revised Date:  2005-11-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7708381     Medline TA:  Early Hum Dev     Country:  IRELAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  S157-74     Citation Subset:  IM; J    
Affiliation:
Unit of Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, University of Bristol, UK.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Breast Feeding*
Colostrum
Developing Countries
Energy Intake
Female
Growth*
Health Status
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Breast feeding and infant mortality.
Next Document:  Association between breast feeding, child development and behaviour.