Document Detail


The globalization of intestinal microbiota.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20549533     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Many microorganisms reside in human mucosa, specifically in the gut. There are many sources of the microorganisms that colonize our gut, and these sources are mainly environmental. Indeed, food is a major source of bacteria and viruses. Food also modifies the equilibrium of microorganisms in our gut, with vegetables favoring a wider diversity. The increasing role of industrial food in our alimentation is generating a globalization of our gut microbiota that may influence our health and aid the diffusion of clonal bacteria.
Authors:
D Raoult
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Editorial     Date:  2010-06-13
Journal Detail:
Title:  European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology     Volume:  29     ISSN:  1435-4373     ISO Abbreviation:  Eur. J. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. Dis.     Publication Date:  2010 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-08-12     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8804297     Medline TA:  Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1049-50     Citation Subset:  IM    
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