Document Detail


The formulation of argument structure in SLI: an eye-movement study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23294226     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This study investigated the formulation of verb argument structure in Catalan- and Spanish-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing age-matched controls. We compared how language production can be guided by conceptual factors, such as the organization of the entities participating in an event and knowledge regarding argument structure. Eleven children with SLI (aged 3;8 to 6;6) and eleven control children participated in an eye-tracking experiment in which participants had to describe events with different argument structure in the presence of visual scenes. Picture descriptions, latency time and eye movements were recorded and analyzed. The picture description results showed that the percentage of responses in which children with SLI substituted a non-target verb for the target verb was significantly different from that for the control group. Children with SLI made more omissions of obligatory arguments, especially of themes, as the verb argument complexity increased. Moreover, when the number of arguments of the verb increased, the children took more time to begin their descriptions, but no differences between groups were found. For verb type latency, all children were significantly faster to start describing one-argument events than two- and three-argument events. No differences in latency time were found between two- and three-argument events. There were no significant differences between the groups. Eye-movement showed that children with SLI looked less at the event zone than the age-matched controls during the first two seconds. These differences between the groups were significant for three-argument verbs, and only marginally significant for one- and two-argument verbs. Children with SLI also spent significantly less time looking at the theme zones than their age-matched controls. We suggest that both processing limitations and deficits in the semantic representation of verbs may play a role in these difficulties.
Authors:
Llorenç Andreu; Mònica Sanz-Torrent; Joan Guàrdia Olmos; Brian Macwhinney
Related Documents :
23109046 - Assessing executive function in preschoolers.
7065986 - Teratogenic hearing loss.
1756526 - Congenital urinary abnormalities and neural tube defects.
16706966 - Screening for children from families with rendu-osler-weber disease: from geneticist to...
16613866 - Theory of mind abilities in young siblings of children with autism.
17346296 - Is neonatal phototherapy associated with an increased risk for hospitalized childhood b...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical linguistics & phonetics     Volume:  27     ISSN:  1464-5076     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin Linguist Phon     Publication Date:  2013 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-08     Completed Date:  2013-06-13     Revised Date:  2014-07-01    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8802622     Medline TA:  Clin Linguist Phon     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  111-33     Citation Subset:  IM    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Attention / physiology
Child
Child Language*
Child, Preschool
Eye Movements / physiology*
Female
Fixation, Ocular / physiology
Humans
Language
Language Development*
Language Development Disorders / physiopathology*
Language Tests
Linguistics*
Male
Photic Stimulation / methods
Semantics
Spain
Speech / physiology
Verbal Behavior / physiology
Vocabulary
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 DC008524/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS; R01 HD023998/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Agrammatism in Jordanian-Arabic speakers.
Next Document:  Speech and pause characteristics in multiple sclerosis: A preliminary study of speakers with high an...