Document Detail


The epidermal barrier.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11032710     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A mature epidermis is an effective barrier which prevents dehydration from the loss of body water, poisoning from the absorption of noxious substances, and systemic infection from invading surface microorganisms. The epidermal barrier resides within the most superficial layer of the skin, the stratum corneum. In utero the fetus has no need for a skin barrier, so the stratum corneum does not start to develop until around 24 weeks' gestation. After 24 weeks there is a steady increase in the number of epidermal cell layers and in epidermal thickness, although it is not until around 34 weeks' gestation that a well-defined stratum corneum has completely developed. A weak epidermal barrier is, therefore, present is very preterm infants (<30 weeks' gestation) during the first 2-3 weeks of life and if the skin is damaged by trauma or disease.
Authors:
P Cartlidge
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Seminars in neonatology : SN     Volume:  5     ISSN:  1084-2756     ISO Abbreviation:  Semin Neonatol     Publication Date:  2000 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-12-18     Completed Date:  2001-01-04     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9606001     Medline TA:  Semin Neonatol     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  273-80     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.
Affiliation:
Department of Child Health, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XN, UK. cartlidge@cf.ac.uk
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Epidermis / physiology*
Fetus / physiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn / physiology*
Skin Absorption
Water Loss, Insensible

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