Document Detail


The effects of weight loss strategies on gastric emptying and appetite control.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21729233     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The gastrointestinal tract plays an important role in the improved appetite control and weight loss in response to bariatric surgery. Other strategies which similarly alter gastrointestinal responses to food intake could contribute to successful weight management. The aim of this review is to discuss the effects of surgical, pharmacological and behavioural weight loss interventions on gastrointestinal targets of appetite control, including gastric emptying. Gastrointestinal peptides are also discussed because of their integrative relationship in appetite control. This review shows that different strategies exert diverse effects and there is no consensus on the optimal strategy for manipulating gastric emptying to improve appetite control. Emerging evidence from surgical procedures (e.g. sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) suggests a faster emptying rate and earlier delivery of nutrients to the distal small intestine may improve appetite control. Energy restriction slows gastric emptying, while the effect of exercise-induced weight loss on gastric emptying remains to be established. The limited evidence suggests that chronic exercise is associated with faster gastric emptying, which we hypothesize will impact on appetite control and energy balance. Understanding how behavioural weight loss interventions (e.g. diet and exercise) alter gastrointestinal targets of appetite control may be important to improve their success in weight management.
Authors:
K M Horner; N M Byrne; G J Cleghorn; E Näslund; N A King
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-7-6
Journal Detail:
Title:  Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1467-789X     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-7-6     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100897395     Medline TA:  Obes Rev     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
© 2011 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2011 International Association for the Study of Obesity.
Affiliation:
Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
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