Document Detail


The effects of training history, player position, and body composition on exercise performance in collegiate football players.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11834106     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Performance data for 261 NCAA Division 1A collegiate football players were analyzed to determine if player position, body weight, body fat, and training time were correlated with changes in performance in the following events: power clean (PC), bench press (BP), squat (SQ), vertical jump (VJ), 40-yd dash (40yd), and 20-yd shuttle (20yd). Individual positions were combined into the following groups: (A) wide receivers, defensive backs, and running backs, (B) linebackers, kickers, tight ends, quarterbacks, and specialists, and (C) linemen. Increases in body weight were positively correlated with increases in BP and PC performance for all groups. Increases in body fat were negatively correlated with performance in the PC and VJ for all groups. For group C, increases in body fat were also negatively correlated with performance in the 40yd and 20yd. Group and training time exhibited no linear relationship with performance in any of the tested events. No linear relationships were observed between the independent variables and performance in the SQ. When individual training data were analyzed longitudinally, a nonlinear increase in performance in the PC, BP, and SQ was observed as training time increased, with the greatest rate of change occurring between the first and second semesters of training.
Authors:
Todd A Miller; Edward D White; Keith A Kinley; Jerome J Congleton; Michael J Clark
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association     Volume:  16     ISSN:  1064-8011     ISO Abbreviation:  J Strength Cond Res     Publication Date:  2002 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-02-08     Completed Date:  2002-03-28     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9415084     Medline TA:  J Strength Cond Res     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  44-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA. tmiller2@mail.med.upenn.edu.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Composition / physiology*
Exercise / physiology*
Football / physiology*,  statistics & numerical data
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Physical Education and Training / methods*,  statistics & numerical data
Running / physiology
Task Performance and Analysis*
Texas
Universities
Weight Lifting / physiology

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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