Document Detail


The effects of sucrose on everyday eating in normal weight men and women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7979340     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Energy intake was estimated from the food diaries of 52 overnight-fasted adult volunteers after ingestion of 110 ml of a solution of either 40 g of sucrose or 4.34 g of saccharin administered in blind conditions. Men consumed more calories and carbohydrates than women. Women's eating was unaffected by the preload. The sucrose preload led to 60% of male subjects choosing to consume a calorific beverage soon afterwards; they then delayed eating compared to men who received a saccharin preload. Men who had received sucrose, but consumed no beverage, ate as early as the saccharin preload group. It is concluded that under fasted, blind administration followed by everyday eating, sucrose does not increase hunger, but eating behaviour after a preload varies with eating habits.
Authors:
M Reid; R Hammersley
Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Appetite     Volume:  22     ISSN:  0195-6663     ISO Abbreviation:  Appetite     Publication Date:  1994 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1994-12-16     Completed Date:  1994-12-16     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8006808     Medline TA:  Appetite     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  221-31     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Behavioural Sciences Group, University of Glasgow, UK.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Affect / drug effects
Body Weight
Diet Records
Energy Intake
Feeding Behavior / drug effects*
Female
Humans
Male
Saccharin / pharmacology*
Sex Factors
Sucrose / pharmacology*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
57-50-1/Sucrose; 81-07-2/Saccharin

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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