Document Detail


The effects of ionised and non-ionised compression garments on sprint and endurance cycling.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22124356     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ionised and non-ionised compression tights on sprint and endurance cycling performance. Using a randomised, blind, crossover design, 10 well-trained male athletes (age: 34.6 ± 6.8 years; height: 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 82.2 ± 10.4 kg; VO2max: 50.86 ± 6.81 ml·kg·min) performed three sprint trials (30 s sprint at 150% of the power output required to elicit VO2max (pVO2max) + 3 min recovery at 40% pVO2max + 30 s Wingate test + 3 min recovery at 40% pVO2max) and three endurance trials (30 min at 60% pVO2max + 5 min stationary recovery + 10 km time trial) wearing non-ionised compression tights, ionised compression tights, or standard running tights (control). There was no significant effect of garment type on key Wingate measures of peak power (grand mean: 1164 ± 219 W, p = 0.812), mean power (grand mean: 716 ± 68 W, p = 0.800) or fatigue (grand mean: 66.5 ± 6.9%, p = 0.106). There was an effect of garment type on blood lactate in the sprint and the endurance trials (p < 0.05); though post hoc tests only detected a significant difference between the control and the non-ionised conditions in the endurance trial (mean difference: 0.55 mmol·L; 95% likely range: 0.1 to 1.1 mmol·L). Relative to control, oxygen uptake (p = 0.703), heart rate (p = 0.774), and time trial performance (grand mean: 14.77 ± 0.74 min, p = 0.790) were unaffected by either type of compression garment during endurance cycling. Despite widespread use in sport, neither ionised nor non-ionised compression tights had any significant effect on sprint or endurance cycling performance.
Authors:
Richard J Burden; Mark Glaister
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-11-23
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1533-4287     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-11-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9415084     Medline TA:  J Strength Cond Res     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
School of Human Sciences, St Mary's University College, Strawberry Hill, Twickenham TW1 4SX, UK.
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