Document Detail


The effect of urban socioeconomic problems on perinatal statistics in Milwaukee, 1983-1991.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8328160     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Perinatal statistics in an urban environment are analyzed over a 9-year period. Perinatal outcome parameters in 27,986 deliveries are analyzed. The number of prenatal visits, low birth weight, illicit drug use, perinatal mortality, race, and age are studied. Perinatal outcome worsened after 1986 for patients with less than five prenatal visits, but not for patients with adequate prenatal care. Adequacy of prenatal care, preventable perinatal mortality, and low birth weight rates worsened for all patients, but disproportionately for black patients. Pregnancies of women of aged 18 to 35 had the highest risk for adverse outcomes. These deteriorating perinatal statistics represent a serious social and public health challenge.
Authors:
F F Broekhuizen; M E Boyles; J Utrie
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Wisconsin medical journal     Volume:  92     ISSN:  0043-6542     ISO Abbreviation:  Wis. Med. J.     Publication Date:  1993 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1993-08-12     Completed Date:  1993-08-12     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0110663     Medline TA:  Wis Med J     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  243-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
UW Medical School, Milwaukee.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Cause of Death*
Female
Humans
Infant Mortality / trends*
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prenatal Care / utilization
Socioeconomic Factors*
Urban Population / statistics & numerical data*
Wisconsin / epidemiology

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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