Document Detail


The effect of predictability on subjective duration.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18043760     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Events can sometimes appear longer or shorter in duration than other events of equal length. For example, in a repeated presentation of auditory or visual stimuli, an unexpected object of equivalent duration appears to last longer. Illusions of duration distortion beg an important question of time representation: when durations dilate or contract, does time in general slow down or speed up during that moment? In other words, what entailments do duration distortions have with respect to other timing judgments? We here show that when a sound or visual flicker is presented in conjunction with an unexpected visual stimulus, neither the pitch of the sound nor the frequency of the flicker is affected by the apparent duration dilation. This demonstrates that subjective time in general is not slowed; instead, duration judgments can be manipulated with no concurrent impact on other temporal judgments. Like spatial vision, time perception appears to be underpinned by a collaboration of separate neural mechanisms that usually work in concert but are separable. We further show that the duration dilation of an unexpected stimulus is not enhanced by increasing its saliency, suggesting that the effect is more closely related to prediction violation than enhanced attention. Finally, duration distortions induced by violations of progressive number sequences implicate the involvement of high-level predictability, suggesting the involvement of areas higher than primary visual cortex. We suggest that duration distortions can be understood in terms of repetition suppression, in which neural responses to repeated stimuli are diminished.
Authors:
Vani Pariyadath; David Eagleman
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2007-11-28
Journal Detail:
Title:  PloS one     Volume:  2     ISSN:  1932-6203     ISO Abbreviation:  PLoS ONE     Publication Date:  2007  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-11-28     Completed Date:  2008-08-21     Revised Date:  2014-09-20    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101285081     Medline TA:  PLoS One     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e1264     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Humans
Predictive Value of Tests*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 NIH NS053960/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS053960/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS053960-01A2/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS053960-02/NS/NINDS NIH HHS
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