Document Detail


The effect of dietary interventions to reduce blood pressure in normal humans.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  2695549     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Changes in electrolyte intake have been advocated to lower the prevalence of hypertension in the normal population. To elucidate the potential impact of such strategies, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of data from three interventions, namely, salt (NaCl) restriction, calcium (Ca) supplementation, and potassium (K) supplementation in normal volunteers. Eighty-two adults lowered their Na intake from 157 +/- 6 S.E. to 68 +/- 3 mEq/day for 12 weeks. Population mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased less than or equal to 2 mm Hg. Ca supplementation, 1.5 g daily for 12 weeks in 37 men, decreased blood pressure compared to 38 men receiving placebo. Ca supplementation, 1 g daily for 8 weeks in an older group of 44 normal subjects, decreased supine diastolic and standing systolic blood pressure. K supplementation with a nonchloride salt in 64 normal adults for 4 weeks had no effect on systolic or diastolic blood pressure even though urinary excretion was increased by 20 mmol/day. The responses to all interventions were Gaussian in distribution. A potentially adverse effect on blood pressure in some normal individuals cannot be excluded on the basis of the currently available data. Although all three interventions may benefit some hypertensive and some normal individuals, the data from these relatively short-term cross-sectional studies are insufficient to warrant generalized dietary recommendations for the normal population.
Authors:
F C Luft; J Z Miller; R M Lyle; C L Melby; N S Fineberg; D A McCarron; M H Weinberger; C D Morris
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the American College of Nutrition     Volume:  8     ISSN:  0731-5724     ISO Abbreviation:  J Am Coll Nutr     Publication Date:  1989 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1990-03-21     Completed Date:  1990-03-21     Revised Date:  2008-06-23    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8215879     Medline TA:  J Am Coll Nutr     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  495-503     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Blood Pressure*
Calcium, Dietary / administration & dosage*
Diet, Sodium-Restricted*
Female
Humans
Hypertension / diet therapy
Male
Methods
Middle Aged
Potassium / administration & dosage*,  urine
Water-Electrolyte Balance / physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL27398/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; RR00334/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; RR00750/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Calcium, Dietary; 7440-09-7/Potassium

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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