Document Detail


The effect of CYP19 and COMT polymorphisms on exercise-induced fat loss in postmenopausal women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15229337     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether genetic polymorphisms in CYP19 [intron 4 (TTTA)n; n = 7 to 13 and a 3-base pair deletion, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with the seven repeat] and COMT (Val108/158Met) modified the change in BMI, total and percentage body fat, or subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat during a year-long exercise intervention trial. These genes metabolize estrogens and androgens, which are important in body fat regulation. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: A randomized intervention trial was used, with an intervention goal of 225 min/wk of moderate-intensity exercise for one year. Participants (n = 173) were postmenopausal, 50 to 75 years old, sedentary, overweight or obese, and not taking hormone therapy at baseline. RESULTS: Exercisers with two vs. no CYP19 11-repeat alleles had a larger decrease in total fat (-3.1 kg vs. -0.5 kg, respectively, p = 0.01) and percentage body fat (-2.4% vs. -0.6%, respectively, p = 0.001). Exercisers with the COMT Met/Met vs. Val/Val genotype had a smaller decrease in percentage fat (-0.7% vs. -1.9%, respectively, p = 0.05). Among exercisers, women with the COMT Val/Val genotype and at least one copy of the CYP19 11-repeat allele vs. those with neither genotype/allele had a significantly larger decrease in BMI (-1.0 vs. +0.1 kg/m2, respectively, p = 0.009), total fat (-2.9 vs. -0.5 kg, respectively, p = 0.004), and percentage body fat (-2.6% vs. -0.4%, respectively, p < 0.001). DISCUSSION: Genetic polymorphisms in CYP19 and COMT may be important for body fat regulation and possibly modify the effect of exercise on fat loss in postmenopausal women.
Authors:
Shelley S Tworoger; Jessica Chubak; Erin J Aiello; Yutaka Yasui; Cornelia M Ulrich; Federico M Farin; Patricia L Stapleton; Melinda L Irwin; John D Potter; Robert S Schwartz; Anne McTiernan
Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Obesity research     Volume:  12     ISSN:  1071-7323     ISO Abbreviation:  Obes. Res.     Publication Date:  2004 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-07-01     Completed Date:  2004-10-07     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9305691     Medline TA:  Obes Res     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  972-81     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Channing Laboratory, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. amctiern@fhcrc.org
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adipose Tissue / enzymology*,  metabolism
Aged
Alleles
Aromatase / genetics*,  metabolism
Body Composition
Catechol O-Methyltransferase / genetics*,  metabolism
DNA / chemistry,  genetics
Exercise / physiology*
Female
Genotype
Humans
Linear Models
Middle Aged
Obesity / enzymology*,  genetics,  metabolism
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide / physiology
Postmenopause / metabolism*
Weight Loss / genetics*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AG1094/AG/NIA NIH HHS; M01-RR-00037/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; P30ES07033/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; R01CA69334/CA/NCI NIH HHS; T32CA09661/CA/NCI NIH HHS; T32EF07262//PHS HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
9007-49-2/DNA; EC 1.14.14.1/Aromatase; EC 2.1.1.6/Catechol O-Methyltransferase

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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