Document Detail


A dual-process model of defense against conscious and unconscious death-related thoughts: an extension of terror management theory.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10560330     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Distinct defensive processes are activated by conscious and nonconscious but accessible thoughts of death. Proximal defenses, which entail suppressing death-related thoughts or pushing the problem of death into the distant future by denying one's vulnerability, are rational, threat-focused, and activated when thoughts of death are in current focal attention. Distal terror management defenses, which entail maintaining self-esteem and faith in one's cultural worldview, function to control the potential for anxiety that results from knowing that death is inevitable. These defenses are experiential, are not related to the problem of death in any semantic or logical way, and are increasingly activated as the accessibility of death-related thoughts increases, up to the point at which such thoughts enter consciousness and proximal threat-focused defenses are initiated. Experimental evidence for this analysis is presented.
Authors:
T Pyszczynski; J Greenberg; S Solomon
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Psychological review     Volume:  106     ISSN:  0033-295X     ISO Abbreviation:  Psychol Rev     Publication Date:  1999 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1999-11-26     Completed Date:  1999-11-26     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376476     Medline TA:  Psychol Rev     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  835-45     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs 80933-7150, USA. tpyszczy@mail.uccs.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Behavior Therapy
Consciousness
Death*
Fear*
Humans
Logic
Self Concept
Thanatology*
Unconsciousness

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