Document Detail


The diagnostic process and perioperative and anesthetic management of an undiagnosed congenital cyanotic cardiac defect in an adult for trauma surgery.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19833282     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A 39-year-old patient awaiting emergency surgery due to a crush foot injury, with an undiagnosed cyanotic cardiac lesion that was diagnosed later as a complete atrioventricular canal defect, is presented. Complete atrioventricular canal defects usually present in the first few months of life and can be fatal if not treated in the first few years. Adult patients with congenital cardiac malformations seem to be at increased risk for noncardiac surgery. The diagnostic process, perioperative management, and anesthetic implications are discussed.
Authors:
Tim Litofe; Jochen Muehlschlegel; Yong Peng; Avner Sidi; Mark S Bleiweis
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of clinical anesthesia     Volume:  21     ISSN:  1873-4529     ISO Abbreviation:  J Clin Anesth     Publication Date:  2009 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-10-16     Completed Date:  2010-01-15     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8812166     Medline TA:  J Clin Anesth     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  454-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0254, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Anesthesia / methods
Cyanosis / diagnosis*,  etiology
Foot Injuries / surgery
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial / diagnosis*
Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular / diagnosis*
Humans
Male
Perioperative Care / methods

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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