Document Detail


A critical reconceptualisation of the environment in nursing: developing a new model.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1392533     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This paper describes the use of feminist theory and critical social theory in the development of a new nursing model. Basic concepts of the model are defined, and the need for reconceptualisation of the environment is discussed. There is no suggestion that this model is in any way complete; rather it represents an exploration of some of the possibilities. In the second part of this paper the concepts of the model are explored in planning interventions for young women with a smoking habit or with disordered eating.
Authors:
J Carryer
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Nursing praxis in New Zealand inc     Volume:  7     ISSN:  0112-7438     ISO Abbreviation:  Nurs Prax N Z     Publication Date:  1992 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1992-10-30     Completed Date:  1992-10-30     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9212162     Medline TA:  Nurs Prax N Z     Country:  NEW ZEALAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  9-4     Citation Subset:  N    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Eating Disorders / epidemiology,  nursing
Female
Humans
Models, Nursing*
Smoking / epidemiology,  prevention & control
Social Environment*
Women's Health*
Women's Rights*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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