Document Detail


A comparison of time to positive culture and time to clinical identification of serious bacterial infection in infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  14686551     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
To compare the time to positive culture with the time to clinical detection of serious bacterial infection (SBI) in young infants, a retrospective case series of 949 infants age 0-60 days, who had a body fluid cultured in the emergency department or within 24 hours of admission was analyzed. Times to first report of positive culture and first clinical diagnosis of SBI were compared. Of 44 infants with positive cultures, 48% were clinically diagnosed with SBI at first evaluation. Of 21 infants with cultures reported positive after 24 hours, 14 were already diagnosed with SBI. Infections that altered therapy were identified after 24 and 36 hours in 4 infants and 1 infant, respectively. In infants with SBIs, the time to positive culture is longer than the time to identification of infection.
Authors:
Julie C Brown; Mark A Del Beccaro; Carla R Clausen
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical pediatrics     Volume:  42     ISSN:  0009-9228     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin Pediatr (Phila)     Publication Date:    2003 Nov-Dec
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-12-22     Completed Date:  2004-04-08     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372606     Medline TA:  Clin Pediatr (Phila)     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  797-805     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98105, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Bacteria / isolation & purification*
Bacterial Infections / diagnosis*
Emergency Medical Services
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Time Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Feedback on a multimedia violence prevention program.
Next Document:  Clinical and parental assessment of sleep in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ...