Document Detail


The clinical and occupational correlates of work productivity loss among employed patients with depression.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15194895     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Employers who are developing strategies to reduce health-related productivity loss may benefit from aiming their interventions at the employees who need them most. We determined whether depression's negative productivity impact varied with the type of work employees performed. Subjects (246 with depression and 143 controls) answered the Work Limitations Questionnaire and additional work questions. Occupational requirements were measured objectively. In multiple regression analyses, productivity was most influenced by depression severity (P < 0.01 in 5/5 models). However, certain occupations also significantly increased employee vulnerability to productivity loss. Losses increased when employees had occupations requiring proficiency in decision-making and communication and/or frequent customer contact (P < 0.05 in 3/5 models). The Work Limitations Questionnaire can help employers to reduce productivity loss by identifying health and productivity improvement priorities.
Authors:
Debra Lerner; David A Adler; Hong Chang; Ernst R Berndt; Julie T Irish; Leueen Lapitsky; Maggie Y Hood; John Reed; William H Rogers
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Volume:  46     ISSN:  1076-2752     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Occup. Environ. Med.     Publication Date:  2004 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-06-14     Completed Date:  2004-09-21     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9504688     Medline TA:  J Occup Environ Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  S46-55     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
The Health Institute, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111, USA. dlerner@tufts-nemc.org
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Data Collection
Depression / physiopathology*,  psychology
Efficiency*
Employment*
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Massachusetts
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
M01RR00054/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; R01 MH58243-01A2/MH/NIMH NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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